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MRI Scan

How MRI Works?

An MRI scanner consists of a large and very strong magnet in which the patient lies. A radio wave antenna is used to send signals to the body and then receive signals back. These returning signals are converted into pictures by a computer attached to the scanner. Pictures of almost any part of your body can be obtained at almost any particular angle and plane. The triple-layered icing on the cake is, MRI has absolutely no side effects, it is completely painless and is non-invasive as well.

What is a 3T MRI?

The 3T MRI, or MRI equipment using a magnetic strength of 3 Teslas, are the most powerful available today. To understand its power, remember that the magnets that are used to pick up piles of junked scrap have a strength of only about 1.5 T.
The strength of the magnet is directly proportional to the clarity of the image produced, so a 3T MRI Scanner will be able to generate incredibly detailed pictures. 3T MRI Scanners, like the Signa HD from the house of GE, are the best of their class available in the field of medicine to date, anywhere in the world. In Chennai, the facility is available only at Bharat Scans.

What is a Tesla?

The Tesla is a unit to measure the strength of a magnetic field. It is symbolized by the letter T, and is named in honour of Nikola Tesla, considered the father of modern electrical engineering, the man who pioneered the radio.
A magnetic field of 1 Tesla will be about 30,000 times as powerful as the earth’s magnetic field, but magnetic fields of high Teslas can be achieved by concentrating magnetic power in a small space. A very powerful superconducting electromagnet generates a magnetic field which is about 20 T strong.
In the medical world, magnetic fields of 1.5 T are most common. Equipment using 3 T is a recent, exciting advancement.

How should I prepare?

You may be asked to wear a gown during the exam or you may be allowed to wear your own clothing if it is loose-fitting and has no metal fasteners.

Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with the specific exam and also with the facility. For some types of exams, you will be asked to fast for 8-12 hours. Unless you are told otherwise, you may follow your regular daily routine and take medications as usual.

Some MRI examinations may require the patient to swallow contrast materialor receive an injection of contrast into the bloodstream. The may ask if you have allergies of any kind, such as allergy to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, the environment, or asthma. However, the contrast material most commonly used for an MRI exam, called gadolinium, does not contain iodine and is less likely to cause side effects or an allergic reaction.

The radiologist should also know if you have any serious health problems or if you have recently had surgery. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease may prevent you from being given contrast material for an MRI. If there is a history of kidney disease, it may be necessary to perform a blood test to determine whether the kidneys are functioning adequately.

Women should always inform their physician or technologist if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. MRI has been used for scanning patients since the 1980s with no reports of any ill effects on pregnant women or their babies. However, because the baby will be in a strong magnetic field, pregnant women should not have this exam unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam is assumed to outweigh the potential risks. more information about pregnancy and MRI.

If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want to ask your physician for a prescription for a mild sedative prior to the scheduled examination.

Jewelry and other accessories should be left at home if possible, or removed prior to the MRI scan. Because they can interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic objects are not allowed in the exam room. These items include:

  • jewelry, watches, credit cards and hearing aids, all of which can be damaged.
  • pins, hairpins, metal zippers and similar metallic items, which can distort MRI images.
  • removable dental work.
  • pens, pocketknives and eyeglasses.
  • body piercings.

In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. People with the following implants cannot be scanned and should not enter the MRI scanning area unless explicitly instructed to do so by a radiologist or technologist who is aware of the presence of any of the following:

  • internal (implanted) defibrillator or pacemaker
  • cochlear (ear) implant
  • some types of clips used on brain aneurysms

You should tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body, because they may interfere with the exam or potentially pose a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Examples include but are not limited to:

  • artificial heart valves
  • implanted drug infusion ports
  • implanted electronic device, including a cardiac pacemaker
  • artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses
  • implanted nerve stimulators
  • metal pins, screws, plates, stents or surgical staples

In general, metal objects used in orthopedic surgery pose no risk during MRI. However, a recently placed artificial joint may require the use of another imaging procedure. If there is any question of their presence, an x-ray may be taken to detect the presence of and identify any metal objects.

Patients who might have metal objects in certain parts of their bodies may also require an x-ray prior to an MRI. You should notify the technologist or radiologist of any shrapnel, bullets, or other pieces of metal which may be present in your body due to accidents. Dyes used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during MRI, but this is rarely a problem. Tooth fillings and braces usually are not affected by the magnetic field but they may distort images of the facial area or brain, so the radiologist should be aware of them.

Parents who accompany children into the scanning room also need to remove metal objects and notify the technologist of any medical or electronic devices they may have.

What does the equipment look like?

The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table that slides into the center of the magnet.

Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not completely surround you; others are open on the sides (open MRI). These units are especially helpful for examining patients who are fearful of being in a closed space and for those who are very obese.

What will I experience during the MRI Scanning?

You will be asked to remove all jewelry and metal abjects like hairclips and detachable dental fixtures.
You will be made to lie on a special table that moves into the center of the magnet. Prior to going into the magnet you will be offered earplugs or head phones to reduce the noise that you hear.
You might hear some “hammering” noises while the scanner is preparing to work. At this time, it is important not to move, as movement will blur the pictures.
You may also feel some vibration during the hammering noise and some slight movement of the table during the examination.
Some patients may be given an injection of a substance called a “contrast agent”, for imaging purposes. This agent is very safe.
Depending on the area being scanned, you may also be asked to hold your breath for few seconds.
The scanning staff will be in another room, but will keep you and the equipment within sight through a glass panel and CCTV. You will be able to communicate with the staff and vice versa by means of microphones and you will also normally have access to a bell by means of which the staff can be called.

How safe is an MRI?

MRI is the safest among the imaging modalities. MRI scanners are good at looking at the muscles, ligaments, and tendons of “soft tissues” of the body. In particular, the brain, spinal cord and nerves are seen much more clearly with MRI that with regular X-Ray and CT scans.. An MRI scanner uses no X-Rays or other radiation.

  • No ionizing radiation.
  • No known biological hazards.
  • High-resolution-isotropic images (3D images)
  • Excellent soft tissue contrast – Opportunity to interpret pathological changes.
  • MRI is usually non-invasive- imaging of blood vessel without contrast injection.
  • Dynamic imaging of joints and the heart.

Some patients may not be able to have an MRI scan. They include people who get nervous in small spaces (claustrophobic) and those with implanted medical devices such as aneursm clips in the brain, heart pacemakers and cochlear (inner ear) implants. Also, people with pieces of metal close to or in a vital organ (e.g. the eye) may not be scanned. There are a few additional safety considerations and some exceptions based on individual circumstances.

Advanced Applications of 3T MRI

BREAST MRI    

  

Breast cancer can be detected right at the start. The uniqueness of Breast MRI @ 3T allows both breasts to be simultaneously imaged with a specialized high-resolution coil. The comparison between the two provided evaluation of quantitative parameters for early diagnosis. It also means that any spreading of malignancy can be detected with specificity and accuracy at an early stage. Since it has no side effects and as no radiation is involved, it can be repeated as often as necessary. Physicians are noticing an alarming increase in the incidence of breast cancer among young women, and for screening of this group, the 3T comes in very useful as there is absolutely no risk of radiation, not even the minimum quantity which a patient is exposed to when undergoing a Gold standard Mammography
Breast MR is used as a highly accurate diagnostic, problem-solving tool prior to initiating treatment in women who have been diagnosed with cancer, because it has the ability to detect additional disease in the same breast as well as in the other one. Also Breast MR Spectroscopy gives clear indication of metabolites for problem solving and demanding application in the breast.

Remember: Lifetime risk for breast cancer 20%-25% or greater

CARTIGRAM   

Cartigram, is a non-invasive imaging method that is ideal for the early evaluation and assessment of cartilage breakdown, particularly to assess articular cartilage integrity. Early detection of cartilage degeneration before the onset of physical symptoms can potentially offer more treatment options for the patient, particularly for those afflicted with osteoarthritis.

CARDIACMRI@3T

Cardiac MRI has long been recognized as an accurate and reliable means of evaluating cardiac anatomy and  ventricular function. 3t cardiac MRI can provide accurate evaluation of myocardial ischemia, infarction, cardiac functions, valves and their viability etc. It helps to decide whether revasculation will be effective or not, that is, if the patient will benefit from surgery. Here too, it is way above contemporary diagnostic tools.

Bharat Scans are pioneers in this field, they have a unique extent of experience.

The 3T complements the 64 SLICE cardiac CT to give a global picture something no one else can do in Chennai.

TRACTOGRAPHY & DIFFUSION TENSOR IMAGING

Diffusion tensor imaging (DT) has been recently introduced, has been recently introduced, allowing quantification of the magnitude and direction individual white matter fibres. For instance, when it is used to scan a tumour-affected brain, it tells how much of the tumour can be safely removed. It also assesses white matter involvement in multiple sclerosis and in head injury patients.

Spine MRI

spine MRI is commonly done for persons with symptoms of back pain and neck pain. Degenerative disc is more finely delineated in  MR than by the use of CT and myelography. MRI is also the most accurate imaging modality for demonstrating cancerous spread of disease in the bone marrow. With the help of 3T MRI we can see the individual nerve roots and assess the severity and the cause of pain like discprolapse.

FUNCTIONAL MRI

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps regional brain activation during various task-related events. It is useful in planning for surgery in patients with epilepsy and tumours to avoid damage to vital regions such as the motor cortex.

WHOLE BODY MRI

A whole body MR imaging is superior to conventional modalities like bone scintigraphy in detection of bone metastasis, (cancer spread).

REGULAR STUDIES DIGITAL X-RAYS

    HIGH FIELD 1.5 TESLA MRI WITH 8 CHANNEL EXCITE TECHNOLOGY
    HEAD
    No Data Found
  • Brain - Routine 
  • What is MRI of the Head?

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions.

    MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays).

    Detailed MR images allow physicians to better evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases that may not be assessed adequately with other imaging methods such as x-ray, ultrasound or computed tomography (also called CT or CAT scanning).

    Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly in the brain) in routine clinical practice.

    What are some common uses of the procedure?

    MR imaging of the head is performed to help diagnose:

    • tumors of the brain.
    • developmental anomalies of the brain.
    • vascular anomalies of the head (aneurysm for example).
    • disorders of the eyes and the inner ear.
    • stroke
    • trauma patients (in selected patients).
    • disease in the pituitary gland.
    • certain chronic disorders of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis.
    • causes of headache.

    Physicians also use the MR examination to document brain abnormalities in patients with dementia.

  • Brain with contrast
  • What is MRI of the Head?

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions.

    MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays).

    Detailed MR images allow physicians to better evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases that may not be assessed adequately with other imaging methods such as x-ray, ultrasound or computed tomography (also called CT or CAT scanning).

    Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly in the brain) in routine clinical practice.

    What are some common uses of the procedure?

    MR imaging of the head is performed to help diagnose:

    • tumors of the brain.
    • developmental anomalies of the brain.
    • vascular anomalies of the head (aneurysm for example).
    • disorders of the eyes and the inner ear.
    • stroke
    • trauma patients (in selected patients).
    • disease in the pituitary gland.
    • certain chronic disorders of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis.
    • causes of headache.

    Physicians also use the MR examination to document brain abnormalities in patients with dementia.

  • Orbit
  • What Can an MRI of Orbits Reveal?

    MRI machines are used to diagnose certain orbital issues.
    Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a type of radiological study. The "orbits," in this context, are the eyes and structures surrounding them.

    Uses

    • MRIs of the orbit are also done when a patient has a bulging eye or eyes so the doctor can see if there is a mass or tumor in the area. Other reasons a doctor might request an MRI of the orbits are swelling, infection, or cellulitis near the eyes.
    • To assess damage to the optic nerve and the surrounding structures. These diseases include multiple sclerosis, glaucoma, Grave's disease, exopthalmos, proptosis, and vascular lesions.
  • Brain and Orbit
  • What is MRI of the Head?

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions.

    MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays).

    Detailed MR images allow physicians to better evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases that may not be assessed adequately with other imaging methods such as x-ray, ultrasound or computed tomography (also called CT or CAT scanning).

    Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly in the brain) in routine clinical practice.

    What are some common uses of the procedure?

    MR imaging of the head is performed to help diagnose:

    • tumors of the brain.
    • developmental anomalies of the brain.
    • vascular anomalies of the head (aneurysm for example).
    • disorders of the eyes and the inner ear.
    • stroke
    • trauma patients (in selected patients).
    • disease in the pituitary gland.
    • certain chronic disorders of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis.
    • causes of headache.

    Physicians also use the MR examination to document brain abnormalities in patients with dementia.

    What Can an MRI of Orbits Reveal?

    MRI machines are used to diagnose certain orbital issues.
    Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a type of radiological study. The "orbits," in this context, are the eyes and structures surrounding them.

    Uses

    • MRIs of the orbit are also done when a patient has a bulging eye or eyes so the doctor can see if there is a mass or tumor in the area. Other reasons a doctor might request an MRI of the orbits are swelling, infection, or cellulitis near the eyes.
    • To assess damage to the optic nerve and the surrounding structures. These diseases include multiple sclerosis, glaucoma, Grave's disease, exopthalmos, proptosis, and vascular lesions.
  • Cochlea (Inner Ear)
  • No Data Found
  • Brain with MRA
  • What is MRI of the Head?

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions.

    MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays).

    Detailed MR images allow physicians to better evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases that may not be assessed adequately with other imaging methods such as x-ray, ultrasound or computed tomography (also called CT or CAT scanning).

    Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly in the brain) in routine clinical practice.

    What are some common uses of the procedure?

    MR imaging of the head is performed to help diagnose:

    • tumors of the brain.
    • developmental anomalies of the brain.
    • vascular anomalies of the head (aneurysm for example).
    • disorders of the eyes and the inner ear.
    • stroke
    • trauma patients (in selected patients).
    • disease in the pituitary gland.
    • certain chronic disorders of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis.
    • causes of headache.

    Physicians also use the MR examination to document brain abnormalities in patients with dementia.

  • Brain with MRV
  • What is MRI of the Head?

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions.

    MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays).

    Detailed MR images allow physicians to better evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases that may not be assessed adequately with other imaging methods such as x-ray, ultrasound or computed tomography (also called CT or CAT scanning).

    Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly in the brain) in routine clinical practice.

    What are some common uses of the procedure?

    MR imaging of the head is performed to help diagnose:

    • tumors of the brain.
    • developmental anomalies of the brain.
    • vascular anomalies of the head (aneurysm for example).
    • disorders of the eyes and the inner ear.
    • stroke
    • trauma patients (in selected patients).
    • disease in the pituitary gland.
    • certain chronic disorders of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis.
    • causes of headache.

    Physicians also use the MR examination to document brain abnormalities in patients with dementia.

  • Brain with Diffusion
  • What is MRI of the Head?

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions.

    MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays).

    Detailed MR images allow physicians to better evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases that may not be assessed adequately with other imaging methods such as x-ray, ultrasound or computed tomography (also called CT or CAT scanning).

    Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly in the brain) in routine clinical practice.

    What are some common uses of the procedure?

    MR imaging of the head is performed to help diagnose:

    • tumors of the brain.
    • developmental anomalies of the brain.
    • vascular anomalies of the head (aneurysm for example).
    • disorders of the eyes and the inner ear.
    • stroke
    • trauma patients (in selected patients).
    • disease in the pituitary gland.
    • certain chronic disorders of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis.
    • causes of headache.

    Physicians also use the MR examination to document brain abnormalities in patients with dementia.

  • Brain with Diffusion tensor imaging
  • What is MRI of the Head?

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions.

    MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays).

    Detailed MR images allow physicians to better evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases that may not be assessed adequately with other imaging methods such as x-ray, ultrasound or computed tomography (also called CT or CAT scanning).

    Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly in the brain) in routine clinical practice.

    What are some common uses of the procedure?

    MR imaging of the head is performed to help diagnose:

    • tumors of the brain.
    • developmental anomalies of the brain.
    • vascular anomalies of the head (aneurysm for example).
    • disorders of the eyes and the inner ear.
    • stroke
    • trauma patients (in selected patients).
    • disease in the pituitary gland.
    • certain chronic disorders of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis.
    • causes of headache.

    Physicians also use the MR examination to document brain abnormalities in patients with dementia.

  • Functional MRI (fMRI)
  • What is MRI of the Head?

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions.

    MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays).

    Detailed MR images allow physicians to better evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases that may not be assessed adequately with other imaging methods such as x-ray, ultrasound or computed tomography (also called CT or CAT scanning).

    Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly in the brain) in routine clinical practice.

    What are some common uses of the procedure?

    MR imaging of the head is performed to help diagnose:

    • tumors of the brain.
    • developmental anomalies of the brain.
    • vascular anomalies of the head (aneurysm for example).
    • disorders of the eyes and the inner ear.
    • stroke
    • trauma patients (in selected patients).
    • disease in the pituitary gland.
    • certain chronic disorders of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis.
    • causes of headache.

    Physicians also use the MR examination to document brain abnormalities in patients with dementia.

  • Brain with perfusion study
  • What is MRI of the Head?

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions.

    MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays).

    Detailed MR images allow physicians to better evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases that may not be assessed adequately with other imaging methods such as x-ray, ultrasound or computed tomography (also called CT or CAT scanning).

    Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly in the brain) in routine clinical practice.

    What are some common uses of the procedure?

    MR imaging of the head is performed to help diagnose:

    • tumors of the brain.
    • developmental anomalies of the brain.
    • vascular anomalies of the head (aneurysm for example).
    • disorders of the eyes and the inner ear.
    • stroke
    • trauma patients (in selected patients).
    • disease in the pituitary gland.
    • certain chronic disorders of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis.
    • causes of headache.

    Physicians also use the MR examination to document brain abnormalities in patients with dementia.

    Stroke Package
    (MRI Brain with Diffusion Carotid Doppler and Echocardiogram)

    What is MRI of the Head?

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions.

    MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays).

    Detailed MR images allow physicians to better evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases that may not be assessed adequately with other imaging methods such as x-ray, ultrasound or computed tomography (also called CT or CAT scanning).

    Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly in the brain) in routine clinical practice.

    What are some common uses of the procedure?

    MR imaging of the head is performed to help diagnose:

    • tumors of the brain.
    • developmental anomalies of the brain.
    • vascular anomalies of the head (aneurysm for example).
    • disorders of the eyes and the inner ear.
    • stroke
    • trauma patients (in selected patients).
    • disease in the pituitary gland.
    • certain chronic disorders of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis.
    • causes of headache.

    Physicians also use the MR examination to document brain abnormalities in patients with dementia.

    WhatisCarotidUltrasoundImaging?

    Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves exposing part of the body to high-frequency sound waves to produce pictures of the inside of the body. Ultrasound exams do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ). Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels.
    Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions.
    An ultrasound of the body’s two carotid arteries, which are located on each side of the neck and carry blood from the heart to the brain, provides detailed pictures of these blood vessels and information about the blood flowing through them.
    A Doppler ultrasound study is usually part of a carotid ultrasound examination. 
    Doppler ultrasound is a special ultrasound technique that evaluates blood flow through a blood vessel, including the body's major arteries and veins in the abdomen, arms, legs and neck.

    Whataresomecommonusesoftheprocedure?

    The carotid ultrasound is most frequently performed to detect narrowing, or stenosis , of the carotid artery, a condition that substantially increases the risk of stroke .
    The major goal of carotid ultrasound is to screen patients for blockage or narrowing of their carotid arteries, which if present may increase their risk of having a stroke. Once the diagnosis is made a comprehensive treatment may be initiated.
    It may also be performed if a patient has high blood pressure or a carotid bruit (pronounced brU-E)—an abnormal sound in the neck that is heard with the stethoscope. Other risk factors calling for a carotid ultrasound are:
    • advanced age
    • diabetes
    • elevated blood cholesterol
    • a family history of stroke or heart disease

    Acarotidultrasoundisalsoperformedto:

    • locate a hematoma , a collection of clotted blood that may slow and eventually stop blood flow.
    • detect dissection of the carotid artery, a split between layers of the artery wall that may lead to obstruction of blood flow or a weakening of the wall of the artery.
    • check the state of the carotid artery after surgery to restore normal blood flow.
    • verify the position of a metal stent placed to maintain carotid blood flow.

    Dopplerultrasoundimagescanhelpthephysiciantoseeandevaluate:

    • blockages to blood flow (such as clots).
    • narrowing of vessels (which may be caused by plaque ).
    • tumors and congenital malformation.

    What is an Echocardiogram:

    An echocardiogram is a test in which ultrasound is used to examine the heart. The equipment is far superior to that used by fishermen. In addition to providing single-dimension images, known as M-mode echo that allows accurate measurement of the heart chambers, the echocardiogram also offers far more sophisticated and advanced imaging. This is known as two- dimensional (2-D) Echo and is capable of displaying a cross-sectional "slice" of the beating heart, including the chambers, valves and the major blood vessels that exit from the left and right ventricle

      For a resting echocardiogram (in contrast to a stress echo or TEE, discussed elsewhere) no special preparation is necessary. Clothing from the upper body is removed and covered by a gown or sheet to keep you comfortable and maintain the privacy of females. The patient then lies on an examination table or a hospital bed

        Sticky patches or electrodes are attached to the chest and shoulders and connected to electrodes or wires. These help to record the electrocardiogram (EKG or ECG) during the echocardiography test. The EKG helps in the timing of various cardiac events (filling and emptying of chambers). A colorless gel is then applied to the chest and the echo transducer is placed on top of it. The echo technologist then makes recordings from different parts of the chest to obtain several views of the heart. You may be asked to move form your back and to the side. Instructions may also be given for you to breathe slowly or to hold your breath. This helps in obtaining higher quality pictures. The images are constantly viewed on the monitor. It is also recorded on photographic paper and on videotape. The tape offers a permanent record of the examination and is reviewed by the physician prior to completion of the final report.

    Epilepsy Package
    (MRI Brain with Volumetric Study and Spectroscopy)
    No Data Found
    Tumour Package
    (MRI Brain, Contrast, Perfusion and Spectroscopy)
    No Data Found
    Giddiness Package
    (MRI Brain, Inner ear, Cervical spine and Neck vessel Angio)
    No Data Found
    MUSCULO SKELETAL
    No Data Found
  • HipR/L
  • No Data Found
  • KneeR/L
  • No Data Found
  • Ankle R/L
  • No Data Found
  • TMJ R/L
  • No Data Found
  • Shoulder R/L
  • No Data Found
  • Elbow R/L
  • No Data Found
  • Wrist R/L
  • No Data Found
    Kinematic Studies
    (TM Joint, Patellar tracking)
    No Data Found
    MR - Neurography
    (Peripheral Neuro Imaging) Brachial Plexus / Carpal Tunnel /Tarsal tunnel Syndrome
    (Entrapment Studies)
    No Data Found
    BODY

    What is MRI of the Body?

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions.

    MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays).

    Detailed MR images allow physicians to better evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases that may not be assessed adequately with other imaging methods such as x-ray, ultrasoundor computed tomography (also called CT or CAT scanning).

    What are some common uses of the procedure?

    MR imaging of the body is performed to evaluate:

    • organs of the chest and abdomen—including the heart,liver,biliary tract, kidneys, spleen, bowel, pancreasand adrenal glands.
    • pelvic organs including the reproductive organs in the male (prostate and testicles) and the female (uterus, cervix and ovaries).
    • blood vessels (MR Angiography).
    • breasts.

    Physicians use the MR examination to help diagnose or monitor treatment for conditions such as:

    • tumors of the chest, abdomen or pelvis.
    • certain types of heart problems.
    • blockages, enlargements or anatomical variants of blood vessels, including the aorta, renal arteries, and arteries in the legs.
    • diseases of the liver, such as cirrhosis and tumors, and that of other abdominal organs, including the bile ducts, gallbladder, and pancreatic ducts.
    • diseases of the small intestine, colon, rectum and anus.
    • cysts and solid tumors in the kidneys and other parts of the urinary tract.
    • tumors and other abnormalities of the reproductive organs (e.g., uterus, ovaries, testicles, prostate).
    • causes of pelvic pain in women, such as fibroids, endometriosis and adenomyosis.
    • suspected uterine congenital abnormalities in women undergoing evaluation for infertility.
    • breast cancer and implants.
    • fetal assessment in pregnant women.
  • Upper Abdomen
  • What is MRI of the Body?

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions.

    MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays).

    Detailed MR images allow physicians to better evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases that may not be assessed adequately with other imaging methods such as x-ray, ultrasoundor computed tomography (also called CT or CAT scanning).

    What are some common uses of the procedure?

    MR imaging of the body is performed to evaluate:

    • organs of the chest and abdomen—including the heart,liver,biliary tract, kidneys, spleen, bowel, pancreasand adrenal glands.
    • pelvic organs including the reproductive organs in the male (prostate and testicles) and the female (uterus, cervix and ovaries).
    • blood vessels (MR Angiography).
    • breasts.

    Physicians use the MR examination to help diagnose or monitor treatment for conditions such as:

    • tumors of the chest, abdomen or pelvis.
    • certain types of heart problems.
    • blockages, enlargements or anatomical variants of blood vessels, including the aorta, renal arteries, and arteries in the legs.
    • diseases of the liver, such as cirrhosis and tumors, and that of other abdominal organs, including the bile ducts, gallbladder, and pancreatic ducts.
    • diseases of the small intestine, colon, rectum and anus.
    • cysts and solid tumors in the kidneys and other parts of the urinary tract.
    • tumors and other abnormalities of the reproductive organs (e.g., uterus, ovaries, testicles, prostate).
    • causes of pelvic pain in women, such as fibroids, endometriosis and adenomyosis.
    • suspected uterine congenital abnormalities in women undergoing evaluation for infertility.
    • breast cancer and implants.
    • fetal assessment in pregnant women.
  • Pelvis (Lower Abdomen)
  • What is MRI of the Body?

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions.

    MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays).

    Detailed MR images allow physicians to better evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases that may not be assessed adequately with other imaging methods such as x-ray, ultrasoundor computed tomography (also called CT or CAT scanning).

    What are some common uses of the procedure?

    MR imaging of the body is performed to evaluate:

    • organs of the chest and abdomen—including the heart,liver,biliary tract, kidneys, spleen, bowel, pancreasand adrenal glands.
    • pelvic organs including the reproductive organs in the male (prostate and testicles) and the female (uterus, cervix and ovaries).
    • blood vessels (MR Angiography).
    • breasts.

    Physicians use the MR examination to help diagnose or monitor treatment for conditions such as:

    • tumors of the chest, abdomen or pelvis.
    • certain types of heart problems.
    • blockages, enlargements or anatomical variants of blood vessels, including the aorta, renal arteries, and arteries in the legs.
    • diseases of the liver, such as cirrhosis and tumors, and that of other abdominal organs, including the bile ducts, gallbladder, and pancreatic ducts.
    • diseases of the small intestine, colon, rectum and anus.
    • cysts and solid tumors in the kidneys and other parts of the urinary tract.
    • tumors and other abnormalities of the reproductive organs (e.g., uterus, ovaries, testicles, prostate).
    • causes of pelvic pain in women, such as fibroids, endometriosis and adenomyosis.
    • suspected uterine congenital abnormalities in women undergoing evaluation for infertility.
    • breast cancer and implants.
    • fetal assessment in pregnant women.
  • Whole Abdomen
  • What is MRI of the Body?

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions.

    MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays).

    Detailed MR images allow physicians to better evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases that may not be assessed adequately with other imaging methods such as x-ray, ultrasoundor computed tomography (also called CT or CAT scanning).

    What are some common uses of the procedure?

    MR imaging of the body is performed to evaluate:

    • organs of the chest and abdomen—including the heart,liver,biliary tract, kidneys, spleen, bowel, pancreasand adrenal glands.
    • pelvic organs including the reproductive organs in the male (prostate and testicles) and the female (uterus, cervix and ovaries).
    • blood vessels (MR Angiography).
    • breasts.

    Physicians use the MR examination to help diagnose or monitor treatment for conditions such as:

    • tumors of the chest, abdomen or pelvis.
    • certain types of heart problems.
    • blockages, enlargements or anatomical variants of blood vessels, including the aorta, renal arteries, and arteries in the legs.
    • diseases of the liver, such as cirrhosis and tumors, and that of other abdominal organs, including the bile ducts, gallbladder, and pancreatic ducts.
    • diseases of the small intestine, colon, rectum and anus.
    • cysts and solid tumors in the kidneys and other parts of the urinary tract.
    • tumors and other abnormalities of the reproductive organs (e.g., uterus, ovaries, testicles, prostate).
    • causes of pelvic pain in women, such as fibroids, endometriosis and adenomyosis.
    • suspected uterine congenital abnormalities in women undergoing evaluation for infertility.
    • breast cancer and implants.
    • fetal assessment in pregnant women.
  • MRCP
  • What is Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)?

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is a special type of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam that produces detailed images of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic systems, including the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas and pancreatic duct.
    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions.
    MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays).
    Detailed MR images allow physicians to better evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases that may not be assessed adequately with other imaging methods such as x-ray, ultrasound or computed tomography (also called CT or CAT scanning).

    What are some common uses of the procedure?

    Physicians use MRCP to:

    • examine diseases of the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas and pancreatic duct. These may include tumors, stones, inflammation or infection.
    • evaluate patients with pancreatitis to detect the underlying cause.
    • help to diagnose unexplained abdominal pain.
    provide a less invasive alternative to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP).
  • Neck
  • No Data Found
  • Mediastinum
  • What is MRI of the Chest?

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions.
    MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays).
    Detailed MR images allow physicians to better evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases that may not be assessed adequately with other imaging methods such as x-ray, ultrasound or computed tomography (also called CT or CAT scanning).
    Click to view larger

    MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures of structures within the chest cavity, including the mediastinum, chest wall, pleura, heart and vessels, from almost any angle. MRI also provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that is important to assess the health and function of these structures (heart, valves, great vessels, etc.).

    What are some common uses of the procedure?

    MR imaging of the chest is performed to:

    • assess abnormal masses, including cancer of the lungs or other tissues, which either cannot be assessed adequately with other imaging modalities (typically CT) or which are particularly well-suited to MR imaging.
    • determine tumor size, extent, and the degree of spread to adjacent structures.
    • assess the anatomy and function of the heart and its component structures (valves, etc.).
    • assess myocardial perfusion (blood flow to the heart) and infarct (scar in the heart muscle due to prior obstruction of blood flow).
    • determine blood flow dynamics in the vessels and heart chambers.
    • display lymph nodes and blood vessels, including vascular and lymphatic malformations of the chest.
    • assess disorders of the chest bones (vertebrae, ribs and sternum) and chest wall soft tissue (muscles and fat).
    • assess for pericardial (thin sac around the heart) disease.
    • characterize mediastinal or pleural lesions seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT.
  • Fistulogram
  • No Data Found
  • Pelvic floor imaging (for prolapse uterus)
  • What is MRI of the Body?

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions.

    MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays).

    Detailed MR images allow physicians to better evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases that may not be assessed adequately with other imaging methods such as x-ray, ultrasoundor computed tomography (also called CT or CAT scanning).

    What are some common uses of the procedure?

    MR imaging of the body is performed to evaluate:

    • organs of the chest and abdomen—including the heart,liver,biliary tract, kidneys, spleen, bowel, pancreasand adrenal glands.
    • pelvic organs including the reproductive organs in the male (prostate and testicles) and the female (uterus, cervix and ovaries).
    • blood vessels (MR Angiography).
    • breasts.

    Physicians use the MR examination to help diagnose or monitor treatment for conditions such as:

    • tumors of the chest, abdomen or pelvis.
    • certain types of heart problems.
    • blockages, enlargements or anatomical variants of blood vessels, including the aorta, renal arteries, and arteries in the legs.
    • diseases of the liver, such as cirrhosis and tumors, and that of other abdominal organs, including the bile ducts, gallbladder, and pancreatic ducts.
    • diseases of the small intestine, colon, rectum and anus.
    • cysts and solid tumors in the kidneys and other parts of the urinary tract.
    • tumors and other abnormalities of the reproductive organs (e.g., uterus, ovaries, testicles, prostate).
    • causes of pelvic pain in women, such as fibroids, endometriosis and adenomyosis.
    • suspected uterine congenital abnormalities in women undergoing evaluation for infertility.
    • breast cancer and implants.
    • fetal assessment in pregnant women.
  • MR Urogram
  • No Data Found
  • MR hysterosalphingography
  • No Data Found
  • MRI Breast
  • What is MRI of the Breast?

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions.
    MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays).
    Detailed MR images allow physicians to better evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases that may not be assessed adequately with other imaging methods such as x-ray,ultrasound or computed tomography (also called CT or CAT scanning).
    MRI of the breast offers valuable information about many breast conditions that cannot be obtained by other imaging modalities, such as mammography or ultrasound.

    What are some common uses of the procedure?

    MRI of the breast is not a replacement for mammography or ultrasound imaging but rather a supplemental tool that has many important uses, including:

    • Screening in women at high risk for breast cancer

      For women at high risk for breast cancer, typically because of a strong family history, MRI may be an appropriate tool to screen for breast cancer. A strong family history is usually a mother or sister who has had breast cancer before age 50. It can also be aunts or cousins, including relatives who have had ovarian cancer. Your radiologist or primary care doctor can look at your family history and determine if screening MRI may be appropriate for you.
    • Determining the extent of cancer after a new diagnosis of breast cancer

      After being diagnosed with breast cancer, a breast MRI may be performed to determine:
      • how large the cancer is and whether it involves the underlying muscle.
      • if there are other cancers in the same breast and whether there is an unsuspected cancer in the opposite breast.
      • if there are any abnormally large lymph nodes in the armpit, which can be a sign the cancer has spread to that site.
    • Further evaluating hard-to-assess abnormalities seen on mammography

      Sometimes an abnormality seen on a mammogram cannot be adequately evaluated by additional mammography and ultrasound alone. In these rare cases, MRI can be used to definitively determine if the abnormality needs biopsy or can safely be left alone.
    • Evaluating lumpectomy sites in the years following breast cancer treatment

      Scarring and recurrent cancer can look identical on mammography and ultrasound. If there is a change in a lumpectomy scar by either mammography or on a physical exam, MRI can help determine whether the change is normal maturation of the scar or a recurrence of the cancer.
    • Following chemotherapy treatment in patients getting Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

      In some cases, breast cancer will be treated with chemotherapy before it has been removed by surgery. In these cases, MRI is often used to monitor how well the chemotherapy is working and to reevaluate the amount of tumor still present before the surgery is performed.
    • Evaluating breast implants

      MRI is the best test for determining whether silicone implants have ruptured.
  • MRI Prostate
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    MR ANGIO (TOF / INFUSION MR)

    What is MR Angiography?

    Angiography is a medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Angiography uses one of three imaging technologies and, in some cases, a contrast material to produce pictures of major blood vessels throughout the body.

    Angiography is performed using:

    • x-rays with catheters
    • computed tomography (CT)
    • magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    In magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer produce the detailed images. MR angiography does not use ionizing radiation ( x-rays ).

    MR angiography may be performed with or without contrast material. If needed, the contrast material is usually injected using a vein in the arm.

    What are some common uses of the procedure?

    MR angiography is used to examine blood vessels in key areas of the body, including the:

    • brain
    • kidneys
    • pelvis
    • legs
    • lungs
    • heart
    • neck
    • abdomen

    Physicians use the procedure to:

    • identify disease and aneurysms in the aorta, both in the chest and abdomen, or in other major blood vessels.
    • detect atherosclerosis disease in the carotid artery of the neck, which may limit blood flow to the brain and cause a stroke.
    • identify a small aneurysm or arteriovenous malformation inside the brain.
    • detect atherosclerotic disease that has narrowed the arteries to the legs and help prepare for endovascular intervention or surgery.
    • detect disease in the arteries to the kidneys or visualize blood flow to help prepare for a kidney transplant.
    • guide interventional radiologists and surgeons making repairs to diseased blood vessels, such as implanting stents or evaluating a stent after implantation.
    • detect injury to one of more arteries in the neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis or extremities in trauma patients.
    • evaluate arteries feeding a tumor prior to surgery or other procedures such as chemoembolization or selective internal radiation therapy.
    • identify dissection or splitting in the aorta in the chest or abdomen or its major branches.
    • show the extent and severity of atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries and plan for a surgical operation, such as acoronary bypass and stenting.
    • sample blood from specific veins in the body to detect any endocrine disease.
    • examine pulmonary arteries in the lungs to detect pulmonary embolism (blood clots from leg veins).
    • screen individuals for arterial disease, especially patients with a family history of arterial disease or disorders
  • Intracranial
  • No Data Found
  • Carotid SVetebral
  • No Data Found
  • Aorta
  • No Data Found
  • Renal Angiography
  • No Data Found
  • Peripheral Angiography
  • No Data Found
  • Four vessel Angiography
  • No Data Found
    SPINE

    Spine MRI

    spine MRI is commonly done for persons with symptoms of back pain and neck pain. Degenerative disc is more finely delineated in  MR than by the use of CT and myelography. MRI is also the most accurate imaging modality for demonstrating cancerous spread of disease in the bone marrow. With the help of 3T MRI we can see the individual nerve roots and assess the severity and the cause of pain like discprolapse.

  • Cervical
  • Spine MRI

    spine MRI is commonly done for persons with symptoms of back pain and neck pain. Degenerative disc is more finely delineated in  MR than by the use of CT and myelography. MRI is also the most accurate imaging modality for demonstrating cancerous spread of disease in the bone marrow. With the help of 3T MRI we can see the individual nerve roots and assess the severity and the cause of pain like discprolapse.

  • Thoracic
  • Spine MRI

    spine MRI is commonly done for persons with symptoms of back pain and neck pain. Degenerative disc is more finely delineated in  MR than by the use of CT and myelography. MRI is also the most accurate imaging modality for demonstrating cancerous spread of disease in the bone marrow. With the help of 3T MRI we can see the individual nerve roots and assess the severity and the cause of pain like discprolapse.

  • Lumbar
  • Spine MRI

    spine MRI is commonly done for persons with symptoms of back pain and neck pain. Degenerative disc is more finely delineated in  MR than by the use of CT and myelography. MRI is also the most accurate imaging modality for demonstrating cancerous spread of disease in the bone marrow. With the help of 3T MRI we can see the individual nerve roots and assess the severity and the cause of pain like discprolapse.

  • Whole Spine Survey
  • Spine MRI

    spine MRI is commonly done for persons with symptoms of back pain and neck pain. Degenerative disc is more finely delineated in  MR than by the use of CT and myelography. MRI is also the most accurate imaging modality for demonstrating cancerous spread of disease in the bone marrow. With the help of 3T MRI we can see the individual nerve roots and assess the severity and the cause of pain like discprolapse.

  • MR Myelogram
  • No Data Found
    VENOGRAPHY
    No Data Found
  • Intracranial
  • No Data Found
  • IVCgram
  • No Data Found
  • Portogram
  • No Data Found
  • Peripheral veins
  • No Data Found
    SPECIAL STUDIES
    No Data Found
  • Fetal MRI
  • No Data Found
  • MR - Whole body Screening for Metastasis
  • No Data Found
  • Sleep MRI
  •     (for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome)
    No Data Found
  • MR CSF Flow analysis
  • No Data Found
  • MR Sialogram
  • No Data Found
  • MRArthogram
  • No Data Found

ANNA NAGAR
Ph : 044 44 100 100
Mobile: 9841059900
ASHOK NAGAR
Ph : 044 44 200 200
Mobile: 9841046663
GUINDY
Ph : 044 44 300 300
Mobile: 9841062221
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Ph : 044 44 900 900
Mobile: 9841949507
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Ph : 044 44 700 700
Mobile: 95510 71777